Radiography Course Work Or Coursework

For 2018 entry and subsequent application cycles, all prospective applicants must meet the academic entry requirements for the course (see typical offers, pre-requisites, English language requirements, and Visa requirements) in addition to demonstrating the NHS Constitution Values. These are:

  • Respect & Dignity – the feelings, wishes, and rights of patients must always be taken into account. It is important prospective applicants are able to demonstrate dignity and respect towards patients as the profession revolves around patient contact.
  • Commitment to Quality of Care – patients are always at the forefront of healthcare and as such should receive and experience care that is of the highest standard possible. It is a requirement for prospective applicants to put others’ first whilst offering a standard of care that they would expect either themselves or family members to receive.
  • Compassion – radiographers come into contact with a variety of patients some of which may be unwell, in pain, or even vulnerable. It is essential for prospective applicants to demonstrate humility, a sense of awareness of an individuals’ suffering, and a desire to help those who are unwell, in pain, or even vulnerable.
  • Improving Lives – healthcare aims to diagnose, treat, and prevent disease, illness, or physiological impairment. Therefore it is important that prospective applicants have the willingness and desire to make a positive impact in regard to someone’s health or life.
  • Working together for patients – radiographers work with a variety of healthcare professionals to diagnose, treat, and manage illness and disease. Therefore prospective applicants need to be able to demonstrate clear and concise communication along with the ability to work in a team.
  • Everyone Counts – all healthcare professionals must be committed to improving outcomes for patients by improving quality and offering patients choices about their care. Subsequently prospective applicants must be able to demonstrate a desire to put the patient first and take into consideration their preferences in regard to care.

As well as meeting the stated academic entry requirements, applicants will be required to attend a selection day held at City, University of London. You will be asked to complete a personality style questionnaire, numeracy and literacy tests, and participate in a face-to-face interview. The latter is used to ensure that your values match those of the NHS Constitution. For further information and example tests, please visit our Selection Day page.

When an application is received it will be scrutinised in regard to the qualifications being studied, predicted grades, personal statement, and reference. You must demonstrate that you are able to meet the entry requirements for the course via your application. Furthermore, we want to see that you have a clear idea of what your chosen radiography discipline is, and understand what the day to day life of a radiographer entails. If an application passes this stage then an applicant will be invited to a selection day. Please note ALL applicants who pass the scrutiny stage will be invited to a selection day. Failure to attend or rearrange to another available date will result in your application being rejected.

The selection day will allow you to visit City and meet members of the radiography team and current students. Furthermore, it will provide you with the chance to visit our teaching facilities. The selection day will encompass a series of admissions tests (numeracy; literacy; Cambridge Personality Style Questionnaire) and a fifteen minute face-to-face interview with two members of the radiography team. The interview will look to assess how an applicant meets the NHS Constitution Values by asking three questions that directly relate to the six values. The following three questions are sample questions:

Question 1 - Explain what you think the day to day life of a radiographer will involve.

Values assessed: Commitment to Quality of Care; Compassion; Improving Lives; Working together for patients.

The aim of this question is for the student to:

  • Evidence a realistic idea of the career/profession.
  • Explicitly refer to provision of care; compassion; team work; making a difference.

Question 2 - You’re a student radiographer attending clinical, you are walking through the department and a service user calls out to you. You approach them and they inform you they have soiled the sheets of the bed they are in. What do you do?

Values assessed: Respect & Dignity; Commitment to Quality of Care; Compassion; Working together for patients.

The aim of this question is for the student to:

  • Demonstrate sensitivity to the needs of others.
  • Understand that the service user in this instance may be embarrassed or even concerned.
  • Think of ways to help resolve the situation.
  • Understand the limit of their own knowledge and experience.

Question 3 - Should an individual who is a smoker and developed cancer be given less priority than genuine accidents or illnesses?

Values assessed: Respect & Dignity; Commitment to Quality of Care; Compassion; Working together for patients; Everyone counts.

The aim of this question is for the student to:

  • Demonstrate sensitivity to the needs of others.
  • Understand that all service users are entitled to healthcare.
  • Show awareness that everyone is entitled to high quality care.
  • Discuss tactfully and diplomatically the basis of the question.
  • Understand the limit of their own knowledge and experience.

All facets from the selection day are reviewed. Applicants who pass the admissions tests and are able to demonstrate that they meet the NHS Constitution values will receive an offer. The conditions of the offer will be made to applicants via UCAS. The following are examples of typical offers that are made:

  • 'A' Level - Typically BBB or a combination of 'A' levels and other relevant qualifications. Must include one of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics.
  • UCAS tariff - 120 points (typically BBB or BBC with a relevant EPQ). For more information on the new UCAS tariff system, please visit the UCAS website.
  • IB - 33 points (must include Physics).
  • Extended Project Qualification (EPQ): We welcome applications that include the EPQ. Where relevant, this may be included in our offer, resulting in an 'A' Level offer reduced by one grade.
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (18 unit award): D*D*D (Applied Science or Medical Science only).

Unless studying towards an Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject, all applicants must have:

GCSE: A minimum of five passes at grade 4 (C) GCSE, including English Language, Mathematics and Double Science. GCSE requirements for applicants studying an Access to HE Diploma are detailed below.

Access to HE Diploma

Pass in a QAA recognised Access to HE Diploma in Radiography or Science only with full award (60 credits) of which a minimum of 45 credits must be at Level 3 including 30 credits at Distinction with at least 6 credits at Distinction in Physics and 15 credits at Merit. Applicants must hold GCSE English and Mathematics at grade C (4) or above.

Special requirements: Applicants must complete a clinical visit and return a supportive clinical visit feedback form.

Students are required to have occupational health and enhanced DBS (disclosure and barring service) clearance.

Academic and character references are also required.

Applications for degree courses must be made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). You can apply through your school or college using the Apply system, which enables you to submit your application directly to the UCAS website.

www.ucas.com

You can apply to up to five universities or institutions on the form. The UCAS code for City, University of London is C60.

Please take care to enter the correct course code when applying, particularly for subjects with a Foundation year or with BEng (Hons) and MEng (Hons) or BSc (Hons) and MSci (Hons) options.

UCAS has implemented an ‘invisibility of choices’ policy so that, on the initial application and while you are receiving decisions, each institution can see only their entry and not those of other institutions you have chosen. This ensures that your application for a course at City is considered solely on your academic and personal qualities.

You should submit your completed application form to UCAS with a £23 application fee. If you want to apply to City, University of London only, you can make a single choice application at a reduced rate of £12.

When to apply

Your application for entry in September 2018 should arrive at UCAS between September 2017 and 15th January 2018. Applications that arrive after 15th January 2018 will be considered only at City's discretion.

When your application is acknowledged by UCAS, you will be sent a personal identification number so that you can access your records via Track on the UCAS website.

Enquiries

For general enquiries about the admissions process at City, please contact our Admissions Office:

Email:ugadmissions@city.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 (0)20 7040 8716.

If your enquiry is about admission to a particular course, please use the contact details provided on the course page.

Contacting UCAS

Website:www.ucas.com
Address: Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS), Rosehill, New Barn Lane, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, GL52 3LZ
Telephone: from inside the UK 0871 468 0468; from outside the UK +44 (0)871 468 0468
For callers with hearing difficulties: from inside the UK use the Text Relay service on 18001 0871 468 0468; from outside the UK dial +44 151 494 1260 (text phone) and then ask the operator to dial 0871 468 0468.

So, you're thinking about attending a radiology school and wondering what to expect from radiology classes? First, every school has a different set of curriculum, but you can be sure that there will be the usual radiology classes on the core set of principles and knowledge you will need to successfully practice as a radiology technician out in the field, not to mention being prepared for certification through the ARRT.

The foundational knowledge you will get from radiology classes

If you have ever found yourself surfing through the course lists on any given college offering radiology classes, you will find that almost all of them will offer the following basic course work before you even get to the good stuff:

  • Basic Medical Terminology
  • Anatomy & Cross-sectional anatomy
  • Ethics - Medical Ethics & Practice Standards
  • Physics (with a radiology emphasis)
  • Medical Record Organization & Management

Browse through any radiology class list and you will almost always find these at the beginning of the program. Some can get away with waivers if these courses have been taken before or for example, if you have taken physics in high school, but this depends on the school's policies.

The core radiology course work:

Now we're ready to get to the good stuff; the radiology stuff you came for that is. At this point, you can expect to be taking radiology classes that will get into the specifics of the technology you will be using, the patient positioning techniques, and applying what you learned about anatomy to real world radiology case studies. The following are radiology classes that are commonly a part of your core training:

  • Introduction to Radiography, including radiography terminology and basic background.
  • Radiology Equipment Operation
  • Patient Positioning Techniques and Terminology
  • Image Exposure & Quality Control
  • Radiography Pathology
  • Radiology Case Studies
  • Applied Learning & Technology Integration

This core set of classes is just a sample of what you will see in almost any radiography class schedule. While the curriculum may differ depending on your instructor and the radiology school you are attending, the basic information and skills are the same.

Externships & Hands On Component

Lastly, every set of radiology classes includes what we'll call the hands on portion of your training. Typically, you might see radiology training throughout your classes and most schools have equipment that you will be able to practice with; however, this is where you get to do some job shadowing with a Radiologic Technologist in the real world. This is where you get to observe what it is like to interact with real patients with real anxieties and real illnesses. At this point, you will get a chance to round out all of that book knowledge and classroom instruction.

Hopefully, this article has given you some insight into what to expect from radiology classes. To learn more, check out the radiology careers page or request more detailed information about radiology course work from schools of your choice:

Radiology School Directories:

 

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