Othello Essay Iago

A Character Analysis Of Iago Essay

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Iago is one of the most interesting characters in the tragedy "Othello" by William Shakespeare. Through some carefully thought-out words and actions, Iago is able to manipulate others to do things in a way that benefits him and gets him closer to his goals. He is the driving force in this play, pushing Othello and everyone else towards the tragic ending.
Iago is not the typical villain in any story or play. The role he plays is unique and complex, far from what one might expect from a villain. Iago is not only very smart, but he is also an expert judge character. This gives him a great advantage in the play. For example, he knows Roderigo is in love with Desdemona and figures that he would do anything to have her as his own.…show more content…

Trust is a very powerful thing that Iago easily abuses. Iago is a master of abusing people's trust to gain more power and further the completion of his goals.
His "med'cine works! Thus credulous fools are caught...." [pg. 1284, Line 44] Iago poisons people's thoughts, creating ideas in their heads without implicating himself. "And what's he then that says I play the villain, when this advice is free I give, and honest," [Act II, Scene III, Line 299] says Iago, the true master of deception. People rarely stop to consider the possibility that Honest Iago could be deceiving them or manipulating them.
Iago makes a complete fool out of Roderigo. In fact, as play starts Iago is taking advantage of Roderigo. Roderigo remarks, "That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse as if the strings were thine." [Act I, Scene I, Line 2]. Throughout the play, Iago leads Roderigo by the collar professing that he "hate(s) the Moor" [Act I, Scene III, Line 344] and telling Roderigo to "make money" [Act I, Scene III, Line 339] to give Desdemona gifts to win her over. During the Iago keeps the gifts that Roderigo purchases for Desdemona for himself. Roderigo eventually begins to question Honest Iago, saying "I think it is scurvy, and begin to find myself fopped in it." [Act IV, Scene II, Line 189]. When faced with this accusation, Iago simply offers that killing Cassio will

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